Video:

Water is Taught by Thirst
Steel cables, fluorescent lights, mixed media
Room dimensions: 15' x 18' x 14'
2013
This installation was created on site in the Gelman Gallery of the Rhode Island School of Design Museum in 2013. Steel cables under tension stretch from wall to wall in a three-part structure that changes angles in midair. Populated with fluorescent lights, clear tubing filled with fluid, extensions cords, cables, rope, string, fabric, paper, wood, and plastic, the dizzying array merges with the architecture of the surrounding space.

A Force Illegible
Steel, polystyrene, mixed media
10' x 10' x 11'
Staples, monofilament, paper
Room dimensions: 10' x 12' x 10'
2013
This piece was created for the 2013 RISD Graduate Thesis Show in the Rhode Island Convention Center. It consists of a 10' x 10' x 11' metal grid, slightly tilted, with a conglomeration of materials exploding out of its center.

A Single Hour of the Day: 2:47 PM
Daylight, monofilament, staples
10' x 12' x 10'
2013
Sunlight streams through two apertures in a wall and interacts with a 10' x 12' x 12' grid made out of monofilament. Because the grid is tilted, viewers can enter and see it from beneath or walk through to the far wall. As the day progresses the environment changes, from subtle camera obscura projections to saturated pinpoints of reflected light on the ground. The light on the grid is contingent: it changes as the viewer changes location, so two people looking at it from two sides can't agree on what they see.

The Whole of It Came Not at Once
2013
The framework for this piece is a grid of monofilament that fills a 10' x 12' x 10' space. Inside the grid, clusters of color-coded crumpled paper are suspended, as though they were trapped in a singular moment in time. They were originally dropped into position from two specific points at the top of the grid. Their final resting point was not interfered with in order to reveal specific patterns of interference and disturbance.

An Imitation of a Light
Daylight, tubing, water pumps, fluorescent lights, programmed electronics, mixed media
Room dimensions: 15' x 15' x 10'; Wall dimensions: 10' x 12' x 4"
2013
An Imitation of a Light is a looming wall of matter, extruding from a slanted opening cut into the far wall of a saturated yellow room. The wall is organized around a gradient of material, transitioning from reflective and translucent materials like clear plastic, thread, and glass to opaque materials like painted canvas strips, rope, string, metal, chains, and paper. The piece is activated by the motion of hot pink fluid pumping through tubing that weaves throughout the wall. Lights embedded in the far end of the wall - nearest the natural light - turn on at night.

then space began to toll
projected animation, programmed electronics, water pumps, glass, water, graphite, fluorescent tubes, oil
actual duration: 11 minutes
2012
then space began to toll is an electronic installation in which a sequence of events occur over a duration of eleven minutes. All of the components are automated and require no intervention, except for the initial triggering of the piece. A projected animation, calibrated to the objects in the room, draws lines and reveals select parts of the installation as it progresses. This is synced to physical events, such as light bulbs turning on, water dripping into tanks, flashing light boxes, and water pouring from the ceiling.

I measure every grief I meet
White glue, water, pumps, tubing, air
2012
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the phase of the pause (first five minutes)
ceiling installation, mixed media, projected animation
actual duration: 30 minutes
2012
This sculptural installation consists of an object field on the ceiling and a projected animation. Viewers stand, sit, or lie down underneath this installation, looking up at the mass above. The objects on the ceiling--a jumble of foam, acrylic tubing, ropes, steel, plastic, glass, studio tools, wallpaper, window blinds, fluorescent light bulbs, food coloring, sheet metal, rust, even a lemon wrapped in electrical tape--are in total darkness until the animation begins. At this point, a line of white light begins to follow the contours of an object, slowly revealing colors, textures, and shapes, until it erases itself back into darkness, skips to another area of the ceiling, and then fills in that space with light. Animation loops after 30 minutes.

the phase of the pause (last four minutes)
ceiling installation, mixed media, projected animation
actual duration: 30 minutes
2012
This sculptural installation consists of an object field on the ceiling and a projected animation. Viewers stand, sit, or lie down underneath this installation, looking up at the mass above. The objects on the ceiling--a jumble of foam, acrylic tubing, ropes, steel, plastic, glass, studio tools, wallpaper, window blinds, fluorescent light bulbs, food coloring, sheet metal, rust, even a lemon wrapped in electrical tape--are in total darkness until the animation begins. At this point, a line of white light begins to follow the contours of an object, slowly revealing colors, textures, and shapes, until it erases itself back into darkness, skips to another area of the ceiling, and then fills in that space with light. Animation loops after 30 minutes.

Process for the phase of the pause
2012
This process video documents the progression of the ceiling installation which will eventually become the environment for the piece the phase of the pause. It also illustrates the development of the calibration system that syncs the final animation with the objects on the ceiling.

the clock strikes one that just struck two
motors, aluminum, cables, lead, sand, water, steel, salt, metal detritus
2011
Two windshield wiper motors on the ceiling spin with randomized direction, duration, and speed, causing cables with lead weights to swing unpredictably around an environment. The landscape is filled with aluminum basins, sand, water, salt, steel, and metal debris. As time passes, the water evaporates, the steel rusts, the lead weights drag through the sand and leave marks on the surrounding obstacles, and the audio landscape surges forward, never repeating each unique combination of subtle and jarring sounds.

Prototypes I, II, III, IV (randomized direction, duration, speed)
servo motor, string, glass, wire, weights, windshield wiper motors, aluminum, high frequency tesla coil, cold cathode fluorescent tubes
2011
This is a compilation of four experimental studio prototypes. Each uses a randomizing algorithm for the direction, duration, and speed of a motor to create unpredictable results. Prototype I shows an early version of a servo motor with two moving glass pendulums, one at each end of the beam bolted to the motor shaft. Later this became an automatic drawing machine, with a piece of vine charcoal attached to each pendulum, dragging across a piece of paper on the floor. Prototype II uses the same motor and program to pull tension on a string for a kinetic installation. Prototype III shifts to a larger scale, using two ceiling mounted windshield wiper motors with airline cables to move weights around a room. Prototype IV uses the same motor and program, but this time an acrylic rod attached to the motor's aluminum beam drags a high frequency wire across cold cathode fluorescent bulbs scattered on the floor, lighting them up with physical contact.

feedback loop
water pump, ink, glass tank, acrylic tubing, plastic, brass
2011
Ink pumps through a tube system, falls from the ceiling into hanging plastic bags, and eventually ends up back in the main glass reservoir, where the cycle repeats. This circulation system is both inefficient and difficult to track. Ink seeps onto the floor as the flexible tubes move, splashes create patterns on the floor boards, the bags swell and shift in height with liquid weight, and the velocity of the liquid causes backups in certain areas that then relieves itself through surges of movement at irregular intervals.